More About the Andersonville Galleria

Getting back to the post previous to the last one, it is time to share more of my hanging process.

After painting
After painting – my subtle green wall

Now that the wall was painted (in my subtle green), I took a close look at the wall regarding traffic flow, lighting (which Elliot from the Galleria http://www.andersonvillegalleria.com/index.html happily helped me to adjust), and the wall that is not connected to mine physically, but visually can be a deterrent due to it being perpendicular to the center of my wall.  The shadow area at the top of the wall created a visual separation and I wanted to be sure nothing would be cut in half due to lighting.

Freshly created lotus blossoms
Lotus blossom scraps of paper
Tags for the blossoms

Next, I took an inventory of some of the items I want to sell. Narrowing it down to three kinds of items I created helped to make the overall placement within the space much easier: 1- the larger size dancer prints from my original watercolor paintings (framed and unframed – the unframed ones can also be ordered here on my website on the Dancer Series page), 2- black and white rabbit prints (also from my original drawings) that I made into one-of-a-kind pieces by adding color with Prismacolor pencils, and 3- handmade paper flowers I created from German crepe paper (a different color on each side) purchased from my favorite paper store in Boulder, Two Hands Paperie http://twohandspaperie.com.

Thumbnail of layout on a sticky note

After taking measurements, but before pounding of nails, I created small thumbnails on sticky notes to get an idea of what arrangement I would prefer.  I started with my largest pieces, the Dancer Series, and carefully began measuring the placements of L-hooks and nails, taking into account the added space needed from the hangers (tabs or hooks).

Dancer prints

Once the Dancers were in place, I measured from the middle and worked my way out to hang the rabbits.  Placing the rabbits on the couch the day before to consider the 2 matting colors and the order of the rabbits based upon the visual direction of each piece, made it so much easier to hang because the placement decisions were all ready made.

Rabbit order one – one mat color on one half, the other on the second half?
Rabbit order two – alternating mat color? I chose the first one with grouping similar colors together.

Dancers and the rabbits hung where the lighting was optimal.  The final section of paper lotuses I hung in the shadowed area, to give an overall flow to the top, while spreading the color throughout.  The lotuses are made in three different sizes which create more interest and texture in an area that needs the interest without over powering the other pieces.

Shadow area above the rabbits
Close-up of crepe paper lotuses

While hanging the artwork, I kept in mind to leave space for title cards, descriptions and an artist statement.

 

Boulder Creek Painting and Photo

Boulder Creek photo w painting

Many times I’ll capture a photo of a beautiful place with the intention to someday paint it.  Now as I write this, you need to understand that creating a painting from a photo is not the same as to make it look just like the photograph.  If that is the intent, why bother in the first place, just use the photo.

I use the photo as reference for shapes and placement.  If you look at the picture above you will see my original photo of Boulder Creek and the unfinished painting.  The original photo is dark due to the overcast day.  I love to use color and using brighter colors, especially compared to the muted tones in the photo, gives the painting more life and joy than the photo.  The color gives me more of the emotion of how I feel when I think of Boulder Creek.  I use the photo to get a general idea of placement, a starting point for a composition, not as a compulsion to put every single bush, branch and stone into my painting.  The photo is a starting point only.